Five kilometers. 3.1 miles. If you were to ask the average non-runner whether they thought that running 3.1 miles was a lot, the answer will most likely be "heck yeah", "that's too far", "why would I want to run that much?"

 

You can do it.

Trail Image 2When you consider that the average human walking speed is about 5km/hr (3.1 miles per hour), it takes a person one hour to walk 3 miles, non-runners can't understand how (or why) runners complete 3 miles in under 25 minutes. But people do.  The question is, why even run at all?  

Besides the obvious health benefits involved with increasing your heart rate and building endurance, running is hard, and for some people it's a wakening moment that measures their state of health.  It's hard on your body, and if your mind isn't in it, you'll be personally challenged as well.

For most people, the physical impact and subsequent soreness is enough to say "no, thanks." But, for others, it's a welcoming invitation for a challenge.  The feeling of sore muscles often gives one the impression of physical improvement - "No pain, no gain", but becareful with this mentality. Listen to your body and take frequent breaks.

Running a 5k is also seen as a mile-marker for many people.  It's an achievement for those aren't used to running anything more than a mile.  Runners identify a 5k as the first goal to a long and successful passion for an active lifestyle.  Once they reach that goal, they set their eyes on the next one - a 10k.

WeekWorkout
1Brisk five-minute warmup walk. Then alternate 60 seconds of jogging and 90 seconds of walking for a total of 20 minutes.
2Brisk five-minute warmup walk. Then alternate 90 seconds of jogging and two minutes of walking for a total of 20 minutes.
3

Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then do two repetitions of the following:

  • Jog 200 yards (or 90 seconds)
  • Walk 200 yards (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 400 yards (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 400 yards (or three minutes)
4

Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then:

  • Jog 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 1/8 mile (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile (or 2-1/2 minutes)
  • Jog 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 1/8 mile (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
5

Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then:

  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
6

Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then:

  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Jog 3/4 mile (or 8 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
7Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then jog 2.5 miles (or 25 minutes).
8Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then jog 2.75 miles (or 28 minutes).
9Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then jog 3.10 miles (or 30 minutes).
CreditCouch-to-5k. http://www.coolrunning.com/engine/2/2_3/181.shtml

How does one train for a 5k?

Embrace the "Walk-Run" method. It's okay to walk while training for a run. In fact - it's highly suggested that you start off this way. Even marathon runners still walk in their training to complete 26.2 miles.

Stay hydrated throughout your training. This is important because of how your body will draw oxygen from it's organs to your muscles and skin to keep your body moving. It increases your core temperature, causes dehydration, and decreases blood flow to the kidneys. So, keep a bottle of water with you. A water-belt works great!

For those who are interested in running, but have no idea where to start, try looking at a couch-to-5k program.  Essentially, the program is designed to get the runner from never having ran further than a quarter mile to running 3.1 miles in about 9 weeks.

TrishaStGeorge5


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